Neon Thoughts

Goal: to have fun one reblog at a time.


Ask me anything  
Reblogged from poesiaespanol

Reblogged from nevver
Reblogged from sokillintime

sokillintime:

jane eyre couplings:

2011, wasikowska & fassbender

2006, wilson & stephens* my all time fav version

1997, morton & hinds

1996, gainsbourg & hurt

1983, clarke & dalton

1970, york & scott

1943, fontaine & welles

(via mcfassy-hiddlesbatch)

Reblogged from cumbertrekky
Reblogged from detectivisms

the problem

the problem

(Source: detectivisms, via bakerstreetbabes)

Reblogged from tastefullyoffensive

fandom-alert:

tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]

This is the realest shit and i can’t handle

Reblogged from magnystique

(Source: magnystique, via fassysource)

Reblogged from themegalosaurus

themegalosaurus:

3x07 // 4x08 // 9x02

(via kendaspntwd)

Reblogged from sandandglass

(Source: sandandglass, via neil-gaiman)

Reblogged from ghastgormen
ghastgormen:

Can the power of a star be sensed without being observed? Claude Rains suggested as much eighty years ago, in “The Invisible Man,” where his features were swathed in bandages, and Michael Fassbender now does the same in “Frank.” 
…The first hour of “Frank” was in danger of becoming merely cultish and kooky, and so the decision to reveal Frank not as a poser but as a genuinely blasted soul, his mind veering between doldrum and storm, strikes me as honest and affecting. It also reveals him without his false head, which was, we now realize, less a mask than a fragile fortress against a world that he, and the contents of his actual head, couldn’t handle. Best of all, we get to witness Fassbender at full tilt—to revel in that gaunt, El Greco mug of his, which, for all its handsomeness, betrays no sunny side, whether here or amid the shenanigans of “X-Men.” In the new film, he sings throughout, signing off in a half-deserted bar with a rendition of “I Love You All,” in his lonely drone. Just when “Frank” threatens to drift away, Fassbender anchors it, reminding us that for some folk, in the music business as elsewhere, the creative act is more of a trial than a flight. There is method in his sadness.
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/08/25/hide-seek

ghastgormen:

Can the power of a star be sensed without being observed? Claude Rains suggested as much eighty years ago, in “The Invisible Man,” where his features were swathed in bandages, and Michael Fassbender now does the same in “Frank.” 

…The first hour of “Frank” was in danger of becoming merely cultish and kooky, and so the decision to reveal Frank not as a poser but as a genuinely blasted soul, his mind veering between doldrum and storm, strikes me as honest and affecting. It also reveals him without his false head, which was, we now realize, less a mask than a fragile fortress against a world that he, and the contents of his actual head, couldn’t handle. Best of all, we get to witness Fassbender at full tilt—to revel in that gaunt, El Greco mug of his, which, for all its handsomeness, betrays no sunny side, whether here or amid the shenanigans of “X-Men.” In the new film, he sings throughout, signing off in a half-deserted bar with a rendition of “I Love You All,” in his lonely drone. Just when “Frank” threatens to drift away, Fassbender anchors it, reminding us that for some folk, in the music business as elsewhere, the creative act is more of a trial than a flight. There is method in his sadness.

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/08/25/hide-seek

(via fassyforever)